I Yam What I Yam, After All

I was at Saorise’s MyGym class today feeling a little frazzled. We’re all getting over a hurricane-force cold, and now that I can move my head about without weeping from the pressure, I’m realizing that Easter is in a few days, and spiritual readiness aside, I’ve got cleaning to do. And shopping. And cooking. And…you get the idea. Especially if you’ve ever hosted a major holiday get-together for your family when you have teeny tiny children running about (or scooting, or nursing, or napping when you need to be shopping…), you know that even if you’re the most laid-back of individuals (secret, please?), there’s some work to be done.  Unless you’re this very nice woman I know–I’ll call her Nancy. She’s the mom of one of the boys in SK’s class, and I know her from the gym (my gym, not MyGym). Nancy was telling me today that she’s all ready for Easter, though there “are some last-minute things” that will need to be done…

As Simple as It Gets

I’d been reading a book on the living room couch with the girls. We’re all miserably sick–snotty, hacky-coughing, bleary-eyed, swollen-faced (pretty image, I know) messes, and we were experiencing just a little window of contentedness before the next round of nose-blowing and tissuing began. Then Quinn threw up all over Saoirse’s book (“It’s ok, Mom. I’m not upset. Quinn just had an accident”). As I was salvaging what pages I could, Quinn somehow managed to grab the handle of the mug sitting on the end table and emptied its (thankfully room-temperature) contents all over herself, the couch, the rug, and a couple of other pieces of furniture. Good times. So I set Quinn, now weeping because she wanted me to hold her, down on a clean part of the carpet and went to grab some towels while SK sat right where she was, happily reading as though the room didn’t reek of a poor man’s coffee shop.  A couple of minutes later found me on my hands and knees blotting Earl Gray out of the (again thankfully…

Okay, Then

When my grandmother passed away this past December, we prepared to take the girls to Maryland for her wake and funeral. Saoirse just happened to have a doctor’s appointment around this time, and I asked her pediatrician for advice on explaining what we were about to do. He told me simply, “You don’t have to explain anything to her. If she asks, just tell her that Grandmom went to heaven.” I remember looking at Saoirse, then back at him. But she’s only three, I told him. Isn’t that sort of an abstract idea for a three-year-old? The good doctor shrugged before he replied: “Isn’t it an abstract idea for any of us?”    Flash-forward to today. We were at Arlington National Cemetery paying a visit to the grave of my dear dad (who’s parked right next to the visitor’s center, by the way. Cannot imagine a more appropriate place for my über-friendly father). Saoirse spotted the powerful Air Force Memorial as we moved through the cemetery. “I remember that!,” she exclaimed, eyeing the soaring spires. &#8220…